Need some guidance for installation in a department

hi I'm waseem
I'm working on a project I just want to know what are the physical requirements for the gibbon to install in a university department?

Comments

  • Hello Waseem!

    I think that would depend on the number of courses, the number of students, the number of teachers and to who you plan to grant access to gibbon.
    It is a web application so if you can run a webserver, recent php and mysql or mariadb (see https://docs.gibbonedu.org/administrators/getting-started/installing-gibbon/) on the machine you should be fine. So for testing you could use an old PC, a small VM or run it locally on your machine via a LAMP, MAMP or XAMPP stack.
    For a production instance you would have to estimate your load.
    adminwaseem32
  • hi..
    how are you?
    how to convert it from local network to internet?
  • and one more thing what will be the load and requirements if we give access to 5 teachers and 250 student logins?
  • How to convert it from local network to internet depends on how you plan on making it accessible from the internet.
    If you have it running on a local server you have to configure your Network firewall (reverse NAT, reverse proxy or WAF) and you would want to get Let's Encrypt certs.
    If you plan on using a VPS it would be easier to scale if you find that your resources don't meet your needs, but you would have to manage the server and security on your VPS itself.

    Considering the migration itself I don't have experience with a similar situation. I'm also just running it on a test instance right now and evaluating it for my school.
    I guess it would be sufficient to create the production instance, export the database from the instance you set up first, check for references to the URL the first instance used and convert them to the production URL, and import it to the production site.
    Doing a quick search in the forum https://ask.gibbonedu.org/search?Search=migrate the first three topics seem relevant.
    Another option, and what I try to do at the moment, is using the import system to create everything. When you get to the point that your school structure is mirrored in gibbon you can easily import it on a fresh install.
    Importing all the data from files also gives you more flexibility in testing. Gibbon is very flexible and sometimes you have multiple options to achieve slightly different goals. When importing your data from files you can easily change a lot of data with a few clicks or delete data structures and recreate it slightly different via the import.

    With 5 teachers and 250 students it further depends on how many of them are going to access your instance at the same time. How regularly are your students clicking a link in Gibbon? What functions will be available to the students and how often are they supposed to use them? What response times are acceptable?
    Although I have no experience hosting a large Gibbon instance I worked with some PHP frameworks and tools. Usually it burns down to the configuration of the webserver (whatever webserver you use, use php-fpm!) and PHP and database access needed. If your students primarily take a look at their timetable and just the teachers really work in Gibbon you probably can get through with 4GB of RAM and a dual core processor. Since a lot of database access is necessary fast storage would be preferable (at least over SAS, better yet SSDs). But that's just my guess and how I would start. @admin or the folks at Gibbon Education Limited (see the link below) will have a better answer for you if you can describe how you and your students are going to use Gibbon.

    If you're not sure about hosting locally or managing a VPS on the internet (Gibbon contains a lot of personal data of your users so you really need good security and great backups!) a hosted gibbon instance is also an option. Have a look at https://gibbonedu.com/. I'm sure they also have enough experience in migrating gibbon instances and estimating requirements.
    adminkelvinmw
  • Thanks for taking the time to create such a long and informative reply @PaulLebmann!
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